STEM FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

What is STEM?

STEM technically stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics.

These days, almost every job – even those you least expect – requires some skill in a STEM discipline. But many students graduate today without those skills. That’s not just bad for students; it’s bad for many New Jersey communities that lack the well-trained workforce needed to attract good jobs.

Maintaining our scientific and technological leadership in New Jersey is essential to our economy and our future. It’s not just about science and math – it’s about being ready for college, careers, and life.

What are STEM Ecosystems?

A STEM Ecosystem relies on partners in a community to find ways to effectively deliver STEM education to students, in collaboration with schools, parents, and local business and industry. We provide a one-stop portal that allows parents, teachers, businesses and others access to resources to help advance rigorous and relevant education in our state.

What is New Jersey doing to promote STEM education?

There are dozens of programs and efforts that promote STEM education in New Jersey -- and more are being created every year. To begin to coordinate these efforts, the New Jersey Secretary of Higher Education in 2014 formed the NJ STEM Pathways Network as a public-private alliance established to inform the alignment of STEM resources, support an education-to-workforce STEM pipeline, identify exemplary formal and informal learning opportunities, and promote STEM career pathway awareness.

How was the STEM Pathways Network Started?

The NJ STEM Pathways Network (NJSPN) was initiated by the New Jersey Office of the Secretary of Higher Education in 2014 as a public-private strategic alliance established to inform the alignment of STEM resources, support an education-to-workforce STEM pipeline, identify exemplary formal and informal learning opportunities, and promote STEM career pathway awareness.

The NJSPN has been recognized by New Jersey governance as a key initiative in fostering integration between the state’s 200+ STEM initiatives and is enthusiastically supported by Lt. Governor Kim Guadagno. The NJSPN is chaired by Laura Overdeck, Founder and President of Bedtime Math and Chair of the Overdeck Family Foundation.